First Sentence.

This is what we do. This is what people do. We stay alive for each other.
humansofnewyork:

“We fled Germany on November 9th, 1938. It was called the Crystal Night, because there were demonstrations against Jews all over Germany, and many windows were being broken. We were living on the outskirts of Hanover. When my father came home from work that night, he told us that the synagogue was on fire, and that firemen were standing in a ring around it to prevent the flames from spreading to other buildings. He said: ‘We’re getting out of here.’”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled Germany on November 9th, 1938. It was called the Crystal Night, because there were demonstrations against Jews all over Germany, and many windows were being broken. We were living on the outskirts of Hanover. When my father came home from work that night, he told us that the synagogue was on fire, and that firemen were standing in a ring around it to prevent the flames from spreading to other buildings. He said: ‘We’re getting out of here.’”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

I would like Martin Scorsese to be interested in a female character once in a while, but I don’t know if I’ll live that long.

Meryl Streep pulling weeds (via kazurinsky)

(Source: tarntino, via tomhiddlestoff)

"If I could, you know, team up with Anna Friel and Chi McBride again..and Kristin Chenoweth, it would just be a very special experience. I miss the show." (x)

(Source: debramorrgans, via tomhiddlestoff)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Out of the Closets, Into the Streets: Gay Liberation photography 1971-1973 at Edmund Pearce Gallery, Melbourne

1. Phillip Potter. Gay is Good,1971, printed 2014

Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte
© Phillip Potter

 2. Phillip Potter. Queens, 1971

3. Ponch Hawkes.Gay Liberation march, Russell Street, Melbourne. Melbourne, 1973

4. Rennie Ellis.The Kiss, Gay Pride Week, Melbourne 1973. Silver gelatin photograph. © Rennie Ellis

5. Barbara Creed.Julian Desaily and Peter McEwan in the back of a VW Combi van, Melbourne. Melbourne, c. 1971-73. Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte. © Barbara Creed

6. John Englart.Dancing with the Hare Krishnas in the Sydney Domain. Sydney, 1973.Digital C type print on Kodak Endura Matte. © John Englart

7, 8 & 9. Anonymous. Graffiti on Melbourne streets.1971-73

(via unadornedmind)

—white people ordering food at a mexican restaurant

(Source: rhubix, via geyezik)